Freakonomics dating websites

It's nice to have a podcast that is popular, but it's another thing to have a podcast that actually changes the world. 6 podcast "What You Don't Know About Online Dating," I thought to myself, "I should try online dating!Can you guess which of our recent episodes changed the world? " After all, if NPR employees are on sites like OKCupid, I might have a shot with one! Long story short: I signed up that afternoon, started with some e-mails and went on my first date (from the site, not ever) on Feb. Tim and I have been inseparable ever since, bring each other endless amounts of happiness, and last night he proposed. We plan to elope in NYC this August, to avoid a large dramatic wedding. You can also read the transcript, which includes credits for the music you’ll hear in the episode.) The episode is, for the most part, an economist’s guide to dating online. ) You’ll hear tips on building the perfect dating profile, and choosing the right site (a “thick market,” like Match.com, or “thin,” like Glutenfree Singles.com? You’ll learn what you should lie about, and what you shouldn’t.Also, you’ll learn just how awful a person you can be and, if you’re attractive enough, still reel in the dates.When Stanford professor and economist Paul Oyer found himself back on the dating scene after more than 20 years, he headed to sites like Ok Cupid, Match.com, and JDate to try his luck at online dating.As he spent more time on these sites, he realized searching for a romantic partner online was remarkably similar to something he'd been studying all his life: economics.

This is the first of a series of episodes that we’ll release over several months. The biggest problem with humanity is humans themselves.He likens the fact to discovering a house for sale has been on the market for a very long time, even if the overall housing market is pretty active — in other words, the fact that this one house still for sale should raise a red flag in your mind."By the same token, if a person's been on a dating site for a long time, or has never had a serious relationship, there's some hidden information that you want to be wary of," Oyer says.During a recent segment of the Freakonomics podcast, Oyer analyzed the Ok Cupid profile of radio producer PJ Vogt, whose jokes about drinking and whose "casual attire" profile photos made him potentially less appealing to women looking for something serious.Oyer's advice to Vogt: "If you want to show that you're serious and you're ready to settle down, you should consider having one or two pictures that show that.""If someone's on a dating site for a long time, that's a problem," Oyer says.

Leave a Reply